Three people who survived a plane crash in New Carlisle, Ohio, Monday morning told authorities the engine “just quit” before it crashed into a nursery greenhouse.

The pilot and two passengers were taken Miami Valley Hospital in Dayton, Ohio, Sunday with injuries that were described as non-life-threatening.

According to the Dayton Daily News, authorities who responded to the crash said the Cessna 172 departed from Andy Barnhart Memorial Airport but crashed into a greenhouse at Studebaker Nurseries, a half-mile from the airport.

The passengers told authorities that the engine quit after takeoff and the pilot, Nathan McBride, 45, of New Carlisle, was able to glide the Cessna until it landed on the greenhouse.

The Springfield News-Sun reported that Studebaker Nurseries has seen six or seven plane crashes on its property near the airport since it opened for business in 1957. Nobody was injured on the ground.

“It’s a miracle, if you looked at that plane you couldn’t believe anyone walked away from it,” Dan Studebaker, the vice president of Studebaker Nurseries told the Dayton Daily News. “It was all twisted metal, it looked like someone could have easily lost their life.”

A Clark County hazardous materials team responded to the plane crash site to clean up and remediate a large fuel spill around the wreckage.

Bethel Township, the Ohio State Highway Patrol, and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) continue to investigate the plane crash.

The day before the New Carlisle plane crash, the Ohio State Highway Patrol responded to another small airplane crash east of Columbus. Authorities said a man flying an experimental aircraft took off from Newark-Heath Airport about 9:15 Saturday morning and crashed less than a half a mile away.

The pilot survived the crash and was taken to a nearby hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. Investigators blamed pilot error for the crash. They said the pilot should have recognized that his engine and propeller configuration were insufficient to give him lift. According to The Columbus Dispatch, the pilot should have recognized that his engine RPMs and speed were too low and should have not attempted to take off.

Mike Andrews, a lawyer in the firm’s Personal Injury and Products Liability section, focuses much of his practice on aviation accident litigation. He has represented people seriously injured in aviation crashes, and the family of those killed in both civilian and military airplane crashes and helicopter crashes.

We're here to help!

We live by our creed of “helping those who need it most” and have helped thousands of clients get the justice they desperately needed and deserved. If you feel you have a case or just have questions please contact us for a free consultation. There is no risk and no fees unless we win for you.

Fields marked * may be required for submission.

Thanks and deep appreciation for all your work

Thanks and deep appreciation for all your work and expertise. We were able to afford many things with our settlement. Many, many thanks again and again. God bless you always.

—Thelma