Mesothelioma Symptoms

When mesothelioma symptoms do present, they are often mistaken for common, minor ailments. Because of this, most people with mesothelioma have symptoms for at least a few months before they are diagnosed.

Mesothelioma can lie dormant for 15 to 50 years after asbestos exposure. When mesothelioma symptoms do present, they are often mistaken for common, minor ailments. Often, the symptoms can resemble another condition. Because of this, most people with mesothelioma have symptoms for at least a few months before they are diagnosed.

But why are mesothelioma symptoms so often misdiagnosed?

Because it may take such a long time for mesothelioma to develop after asbestos exposure, people who have meso often do not immediately make the connection between the symptoms of mesothelioma and their exposure. As a result, they do not mention asbestos exposure to their doctor. Because mesothelioma is a rare type of cancer, it would not necessarily be top of mind for a doctor. As a result, mesothelioma symptoms easily can be mistaken for other, much more common ailments.

What are the mesothelioma symptoms to watch for?


Mesothelioma symptoms very depending on where in the body the disease originates. There are four types of mesothelioma that affect different parts of the body. All have been linked to asbestos exposure.

The four types of mesothelioma are:

  • Pleural Mesothelioma – affecting the lining of the lungs;
  • Peritoneal Mesothelioma – affecting the lining of the abdomen;
  • Pericardial Mesothelioma – affecting the lining of the heart; and
  • Tunica Vaginalis Mesothelioma – affecting the sac surrounding the testicles.

More information about the different types of mesothelioma and most often occurring mesothelioma symptoms for each type are outlined in more detail below.

Pleural Mesothelioma

Pleural mesothelioma affects the pleura, or lining that coats the lungs and chest wall, and accounts for about 75% of all cases of mesothelioma. Most asbestos-related mesotheliomas are pleural mesotheliomas.

Pleural mesothelioma symptoms:
  • Pain in the side of the chest or lower back
  • Shortness of breath
  • Cough
  • Fever
  • Excessive sweating
  • Fatigue
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Hoarseness
  • Swelling of the face and arms

Peritoneal Mesothelioma

Peritoneal mesothelioma involves the peritoneum, which lines the inside of the abdomen and many of the abdominal organs. About 25% of mesothelioma diagnoses are peritoneal mesotheliomas.

Peritoneal mesothelioma symptoms:
  • Abdominal pain
  • Swelling or fluid in the abdomen
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Constipation

Tunica Vaginalis Mesothelioma

Tunica vaginalis mesothelioma, also referred to as testicular mesothelioma, affects the sac surrounding the testicles, and is also extremely rare.

Tunica vaginalis mesothelioma symptoms:
  • Hydrocele (buildup of fluid in the scrotum)
  • Abnormal lump inside the scrotum
  • Pain and swelling of the testes

Pericardial Mesothelioma

Pericardial mesothelioma develops in the lining around the heart, and is extremely rare.

Pericardial mesothelioma symptoms:
  • Abdominal pain
  • Swelling or fluid in the abdomen
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Constipation

Mesothelioma Diagnosis


When patients visit a medical professional reporting signs or symptoms of mesothelioma, the doctor will want to get a medical history to learn about symptoms and possible risk factors, such as asbestos exposure. But remember, if asbestos exposure occurred a long time ago, a patient may not think about it as a possible cause for their symptoms, and a doctor may not know to ask. It is important for someone with mesothelioma symptoms to mention past or possible asbestos exposure to their doctor, even if the exposure took place a long time ago.

Because mesothelioma symptoms could indicate a variety of other ailments, the doctor may perform a series of diagnostic tests – including imaging tests like X-rays, MRIs, CTs and PET scans; blood tests; and biopsies – to find out what is wrong before accurately diagnosing mesothelioma. Which tests are performed often depends on the type of symptoms.

Diagnostic tests for mesothelioma include:

Chest X-Ray

A chest X-ray is typically ordered for patients with pleural mesothelioma symptoms such as constant cough or shortness of breath. Findings that might suggest mesothelioma include abnormal thickening of the pleura, calcium deposits on the pleura, fluid between the lungs and chest wall, or changes in the lungs.

Ultrasound

Ultrasound, or sonography, uses high-frequency sound waves to produce pictures of the inside of the body. Ultrasounds are 90% accurate at detecting testicular tumors and are often used to when patients present with symptoms of tunica vaginalis mesothelioma, or testicular mesothelioma.

Echocardiogram

This test also uses sound waves to capture images of the heart’s chambers, valves, walls and the blood vessels attached to the heart. An echocardiogram can show how well the heart is functioning. This test might reveal pericardial mesothelioma.

Computed Tomography (CT) Scan

A chest X-ray is typically ordered for patients with pleural mesothelioma symptoms such as constant cough or shortness of breath. Findings that might suggest mesothelioma include abnormal thickening of the pleura, calcium deposits on the pleura, fluid between the lungs and chest wall, or changes in the lungs.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Scan

Similar to CT scans, MRI scans make detailed images of the body’s soft tissues. But, MRIs use radio waves and strong magnets instead of X-rays. Prior to testing, patients are injected with a contrast material called gadolinium. This provides better contrast in the images captured. MRI scans can help show the exact location and extent of a tumor.

Positron Emissions Tomography (PET) Scan

This test also uses sound waves to capture images of the heart’s chambers, valves, walls and the blood vessels attached to the heart. An echocardiogram can show how well the heart is functioning. This test might reveal pericardial mesothelioma.

Blood Tests

People with mesothelioma may have markers, or higher levels of certain substances, in their blood that helps doctors narrow in on a diagnosis. These substances include osteopontin and soluble mesothelin-related peptides (SMRPs).

Fluid and Tissue Sample Tests

Test results may strongly suggest a patient has mesothelioma, but the actual diagnosis is made by performing a biopsy. During a biopsy, cells are removed from an abnormal area and looked at through a microscope. Biopsies can be performed in different ways depending on a patient’s situation.

Mesothelioma can cause a buildup of fluid in the chest, abdomen, or heart. This fluid is removed and tested for its chemical makeup. If cancer cells are found, special tests can be done to determine if the cancer is mesothelioma or another type of cancer.

Biopsies can also be performed by inserting a needle into the tumor, a procedure called a needle biopsy; by using an endoscope during which a small camera is sent down a patient’s throat; or through open surgery.

Once mesothelioma is diagnosed, a doctor will determine the type of mesothelioma, the staging, and recommend a course of treatment.

Mesothelioma Staging


Once malignant mesothelioma has been diagnosed, doctors will try to determine whether the cancer has spread and, if so, how far, a process called staging. This helps doctors determine how serious the cancer is and the best way to treat it. Staging ranges from I (1) to IV (4), with the lower number meaning the less the cancer has spread, and the higher number meaning the cancer has spread more.

There are different ways cancer is staged. The American Joint Committee on Cancer uses the TNM system based on three key pieces of information:

  1. The size of the tumor (T), such as whether it has grown into nearby structures or organs;
  2. Whether the cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes (N); and
  3. Whether it has spread, or metastasized (M) to distant organs.

The TNM system groups mesotheliomas into several stages that give a more clear idea of a patient’s prognosis. Staging can also determine whether a cancer is resectable (where all visible sides of the tumor can be removed by surgery) or unresectable.

Even if mesothelioma tumors can be surgically removed, in most cases cancer cells can be left behind after surgery. For this reason, doctors may use other treatments, such as radiation and/or chemotherapy.

Mesothelioma Cell Types

Mesothelioma is also categorized by cell type. There are three main cell variations that can help determine a patient’s prognosis and treatment options.

  • Epithelioid cells are the most common cell type in patients with mesothelioma. Patients with epithelioid cell type tend to have the best life expectancy, because this type of cell variation is most receptive to treatment.
  • Sarcomatoid cells are the least common cell type. These cells spread faster than epithelioid cells resulting in a shorter survival and fewer treatment options.
  • Biphasic cell types are those with both epithelioid and sarcomatoid cells present. Life expectancy is better in patients with more epithelioid cells present than sarcomatoid cells.

Mesothelioma Treatment


After mesothelioma has been diagnosed and staged, treatment options will be discussed with the patient. Options may include surgery, radiation therapy, and/or chemotherapy. Some patients may be candidates for clinical trials to test new therapies.

The risks and benefits of each treatment will be discussed with patients to determine the best course of action. For some, palliative procedures can be used to help ease symptoms of the disease.

Mesothelioma Prognosis


Mesothelioma prognosis depends on the size of the cancer, where it is, how far it has spread, the type of cells present, how well the cancer responds to treatment, the general health of the patient, as well as other factors.

Asbestos Exposure


Mesothelioma is caused by asbestos exposure. In work environments, those most often exposed to this toxic mineral include miners, factory workers, insulation manufacturers and installers, railroad and automotive works, ship builders, plumbers, and construction workers.

Family members of people who work in environments where asbestos is present can also be at risk for secondary asbestos exposure, because asbestos fibers can adhere to workers’ clothes and be carried home. Just washing clothes of someone who works around asbestos can cause secondary asbestos exposure and increase the risk of developing mesothelioma.

Non-occupational asbesots exposure is also becoming more common in mesothelioma diagnoses. These cases may be very difficult to diagnose because the patient would not quickly associate their mesothelioma symptoms with asbestos exposure – because they might not even realize they had been exposed. Many people could have been exposed to microscopic asbestos fibers without knowing — home insulation, automotive parts, even talcum powder can become contaminated with the carcinogenic fibers.

For example, someone who renovated an older home, where asbestos was commonly used for decades as an insulation material, may have unknowingly broken or crushed asbestos, releasing the microscopic fibers that can cause mesothelioma.

A study published by researchers at the Occupational Cancer Research Centre at Ontario Health in Canada in October 2020 compared 4,000 cases of mesothelioma in British Columbia and Ontario from 1993-2017. While the bulk of cases were still tied to occupational exposure to asbestos – either directly by workers exposed on the job or secondary exposure from contact with asbestos brought home on clothes or work gear – results indicated a growing number of non-occupational mesothelioma. This new group of mesothelioma patients is made up of primarily older adults and women.

In addition to mesothelioma, asbestos exposure increases the risk of lung cancer.

Mesothelioma Law Firm


Beasley Allen has a team of experienced mesothelioma lawyers representing victims of asbestos exposure. Our mesothelioma lawyers have shown that all too often giant corporations are choosing profits over people, covering up asbestos risks in the workplace and in consumer products. Employers continue to allow their workers to be exposed to asbestos on the job without warning them about the serious risks, and do not disclose asbestos contamination in products like talcum powder, cosmetics and even children’s toys. Until they are forced to compensate victims of asbestos, they will continue on with their blatant disregard for the health and well-being of their employees and their consumers.

If your loved one has suffered a serious injury or death as a result of asbestos exposure or mesothelioma, you may be entitled to compensation for medical expenses, loss of wages, and pain and suffering. Please contact our mesothelioma lawyers today by filling out the brief questionnaire, or by calling our toll-free number (1-800-898-2034) for a free, no-cost, no-obligation legal evaluation of your case.

Recent Mesothelioma News


Free Case Evaluation

The experienced and professional attorneys from The Beasley Allen Law Firm are here for you and available to help. We're committed to helping those who need it most, no matter what. Contact us today and get your free case evaluation by our legal team.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

1-800-898-2034 (tel)
855-674-1818 (fax)

All rights reserved. Use of this website signifies your agreement to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

Attorney Advertising – Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.

Scroll to Top