$12,350,000 Verdict Involving Insurance Fraud

posted on:
January 15, 2008

author:
Staff

category:
Fraud | Landmark Verdict

June, 1999 – This case involved an insurance company's scheme to sell life insurance policies with the misrepresentations that the premium would never change. The jury found that the company's agents were selling these policies based on the representations that the policy premium was "fixed" was a fraudulent representation and found for the Plaintiff, awarding $12 million in punitive damages and $350,000.00 in compensatory damages.

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CFTC whistleblower program finally gaining steam

posted on:
December 8, 2017

author:
Archie Grubb

category:
Fraud

archie grubb1 CFTC whistleblower program finally gaining steamThe Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) whistleblower program has seen a surge of activity in the past few months, and the agency expects to pay whistleblower awards of $45.5 million.

Speaking at a recent conference in Washington D.C., CFTC Whistleblower Office director Christopher Ehrman said “This year for us is going to be huge.”

“As of Sept. 30, 2017, the Commission has determined that it is probable that it will make whistleblower awards of approximately $45.5 million as a result of valid whistleblower claims on Commission-imposed sanctions that have already been collected,” an independent auditor’s report commissioned by the CFTC Office of Inspector General stated on Oct. 27, according to Forbes.

Payouts of $45.5 million would be a record for the CFTC since its whistleblower program was created under the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010. In fact, the figure is more than four times the total amount the CFTC has paid to informants since its whistleblower program launched.

According to Forbes, the CFTC’s whistleblower program still lags behind the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) whistleblower program, which was also created by Dodd-Frank to combat the rampant Wall Street fraud that dragged the U.S. into an economic crisis in 2008.

However, annual increases in reports submitted to the CFTC whistleblower program indicate that more and more people are becoming familiar with it and its potential benefits.

In May, the CFTC announced it that its board unanimously approved measures to make it less risky for would-be whistleblowers to call out fraud and other wrongdoing. These measures prohibit employers from retaliating against whistleblowers and allow employees to sue their employer for whistleblower-related retaliation.

Additionally, the new measures also give the CFTC authority to take enforcement action against any employer that retaliates against its employees for whistleblowing activity. Like the SEC’s whistleblower program, the CFTC does not disclose any information about a case that could reveal a whistleblower’s identity.

The CFTC pays monetary awards to whistleblowers ranging from 10 to 30 percent of the total sanctions when those sanctions top $1 million.

According to Forbes, some of the whistleblower reports the CFTC received last year related to “virtual currency trading, spoofing, market manipulation, false reporting, misrepresentations to customers regarding the handling of their accounts, fraud involving foreign currency exchanges, Ponzi schemes and other off-exchange investment scams involving futures.”

* * *

Are you aware of fraud being committed against the federal government, or a state government? If so, you may be protected and rewarded for doing the right thing by reporting the fraud. If you have any questions about whether you qualify as a whistleblower, please contact an attorney at Beasley Allen for a free and confidential evaluation of your claim. There is a contact form on this website, or you may email one of the lawyers on our whistleblower litigation team: Archie Grubb, Larry Golston, Lance Gould or Andrew Brashier.

Sources:
CFTC
Forbes

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At Beasley Allen, there is never a fee for legal services, unless we collect for you. Contact us today by filling out a brief questionnaire, or by calling our toll free number, 1-800-898-2034, for a free, no-cost no-obligation evaluation of your case.

76 years after Pearl Harbor: technology advancements for military-related TBI

posted on:
December 7, 2017

author:
Mike Andrews

Mike Andrews 76 years after Pearl Harbor: technology advancements for military related TBIToday we honor the 2,402 military personnel and civilians killed during the attack on Pearl Harbor 76 years ago, which launched the U.S. into World War II. As we honor their courage, we are reminded of the sacrifices made by our veterans and active-duty service members to defend the freedom and values Americans hold dear. While some return with very visible reminders of their sacrifices, others return with less apparent wounds, such as Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBIs).

Beasley Allen has previously described a TBI as a “blow or jolt to the head or a penetrating head injury that disrupts the function of the brain.” It has become the signature injury of the of the more recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center notes that 361,092 military-related TBIs, or mTBIs, have been reported since 2000. However, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) explains that “[t]he first large-scale evidence of military-related mTBI occurred in World War I… in association with the frequent use of high explosives in trench warfare.”

In the more than seven decades following Pearl Harbor, the military has invested significant resources in researching mTBIs, including how to quickly diagnose and treat the injuries. These injuries can have long-lasting effects on service members, which has raised concerns among military leaders regarding the health and safety of individual service members, the level of unit readiness, and troop retention.

Most recently, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) contracted with Neural Analytics, Inc. to develop the Lucid System, a device “designed to measure and monitor physical signs of TBI,” according to Army Times. With a half hour of training, ideally, the device and software will give troops the capability to more effectively diagnose mTBIs and their severity and take swift action to save more lives on the battlefield. The estimated completion date is within 18 months, or by March 2019.

While there is no effective treatment or intervention for TBIs, the NCBI reports that hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) may be promising. While the therapy remains an experimental treatment for TBI, it has shown beneficial results in stroke patients and varying results in people suffering PTSD and TBIs.

Last week, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Secretary David Shulkin announced that the VA will begin offering HBOT to a limited number of veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) – even though the treatment is still considered off-label for treating the condition, according to Task and Purpose. The military will monitor the results to determine the treatment’s effectiveness in patients with PTSD.

The step could open the treatment up in the future to those suffering from mTBI since researchers have found evidence linking the two conditions. One study of active-duty Marines reported by JAMA Psychiatry found that “[e]ven when accounting for predeployment symptoms, prior TBI, and combat intensity, TBI during the most recent deployment is the strongest predictor of postdeployment PTSD symptoms.”

With new technology and more awareness about the less visual wounds of war, veterans and active-duty service members may have more opportunities to address injuries that resulted in conditions such as mTBIs. Yet, more can and must be done to better protect those who sacrifice so much for our freedom.

* * *

Mike Andrews, a lawyer in our firm’s Personal Injury & Products Liability Section, handles cases involving traumatic brain injuries. You can contact him at 800-898-2034 or Mike.Andrews@beasleyallen.com.

Sources:
Business Insider
Beasley Allen
Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center
National Center for Biotechnology Information
Army Times
Task and Purpose
JAMA Psychiatry

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At Beasley Allen, there is never a fee for legal services, unless we collect for you. Contact us today by filling out a brief questionnaire, or by calling our toll free number, 1-800-898-2034, for a free, no-cost no-obligation evaluation of your case.

More data links PPIs to kidney disease, failure

posted on:
December 6, 2017

author:
Tiffany Roberts

tiffany roberts More data links PPIs to kidney disease, failureData from a recent analysis of studies examining the link between kidney disease and patients using proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) shows a 33 percent increase in risk of developing chronic kidney disease or kidney failure compared to non-PPI users, Eurekalert reports. The outlet cites the American Society of Nephrology (ASN), which presented the findings at its latest ASN Kidney Week conference last month.

PPIs are heartburn drugs that have been on the market since the 1980s, as Beasley Allen has previously explained. They are used to treat acid-related disorders such as stomach ulcers, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and acid reflux. Studies dating to the 1990s link PPI use to kidney disease and failure. One study from 1992 linked the drugs to Acute Interstitial Nephritis (AIN), inflammation in the spaces between the kidney tubules. Additional studies later linked the drugs to an increased risk of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI or Acute Renal Failure) and Chronic Kidney Disease.

Charat Thongprayoon, MD from the Bassett Medical Center led a team of researchers that analyzed five published studies reporting the risk of chronic kidney disease or kidney failure among PPI users compared with non-users. There were a combined 536,902 eligible participants included in the meta-analysis.

Dr. Thongprayoon explained that the “study demonstrates a significant association between the use of PPIs and increased risks of chronic kidney disease and kidney failure.” He also warned doctors to use caution when prescribing PPIs, especially for chronic use.

The class of drugs is among the most commonly prescribed worldwide and includes Prilosec, Prevacid and Nexium, as Beasley Allen has discussed.

There are 315 lawsuits now pending in a multidistrict litigation (MDL) in the U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey, according to the U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation. Plaintiffs are suing PPI manufacturers including Takeda Pharmaceutical Co.; AstraZeneca; Pfizer Inc. (and its subsidiaries Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Wyeth, LLC, and Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories); Procter & Gamble Company; and Novartis Consumer Health, Inc. (and its subsidiaries Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics, Inc. and Novartis Institute for Biomedical Research, Inc). The plaintiffs argue that the drugmakers failed to warn consumers about the drugs’ potential to cause kidney damage.

* * *

Lawyers in our firm’s Mass Torts Section are currently investigating cases for people who used PPIs and developed AIN, AKI or Acute Renal Failure, or Chronic Kidney Disease. If you would like more information, contact Tiffany Roberts at 800-898-2034 or by email at Tiffany.Roberts@beasleyallen.com.

Sources:
Eurekalert/ American Society of Nephrology
Beasley Allen
U.S. Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation

Free Legal Consultation
At Beasley Allen, there is never a fee for legal services, unless we collect for you. Contact us today by filling out a brief questionnaire, or by calling our toll free number, 1-800-898-2034, for a free, no-cost no-obligation evaluation of your case.

FLSA protects employees during busy holiday employment season

posted on:
December 5, 2017

author:
Leon Hampton

category:
Fraud

Leon Hampton FLSA protects employees during busy holiday employment seasonOnce again, that special time of year is upon us. The parties, presents and packages take center stage as we wind down our year and gear up for the next. With the seasonal fun comes the annual hustle and bustle to buy the perfect gift and get it to its destination. It’s that hustle and bustle that creates changes in the workforce. Employees often pick up extra shifts or an additional seasonal job during this end-of-the year rush, highlighting the importance of knowing employee legal protections.

For businesses, this is often their busiest time of year. The United States Postal Service is expecting to deliver more than 15 billion pieces of mail this season, a 10 percent increase from the last, and will have to hire additional employees to meet the temporary demand. UPS and FedEx are in the same boat. UPS plans to hire roughly 95,000 temporary workers, and FedEx is planning to add more than 50,000 seasonal workers to its payroll.

As for retail stores, Target plans to hire 100,000 seasonal workers, and even though it has filed for bankruptcy, Toys R Us is hiring 12,000 part-time workers. In a break from previous years, Wal-Mart has opted this year to increase the hours of its part-time staff up to 40 hours a week in order to meet the holiday demand.

According to The Washington Post, the move comes as a way to reduce criticism about keeping employees from full-time work and reduces the costs of hiring and training a temporary workforce. Of course, the new policy has raised questions about its implementation. As Randy Parraz, director of Making Change at Walmart, told The Post, “It’s one thing to offer more hours. It’s another thing to mandate them.”

With the workforce changes occurring during the holidays, what laws come into play? The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) “establishes minimum wage, overtime pay, recordkeeping, and child labor standards affecting full-time and part-time workers in the private sector and in Federal, State, and local governments,” according to the U.S. Department of Labor. It sets the federal minimum wage at $7.25 an hour and dictates that overtime pay is no less than one and one-half times employees’ regular pay for more than 40 hours of work a week. It even technically defines a workweek as a period of 168 hours during 7 consecutive 24-hour periods.

The FLSA covers most employees in America, including those hired as seasonal help, because it applies to workers engaged in interstate commerce, which clearly includes businesses where products are made or sold. But it also includes employees who work “in any closely related process or occupation directly essential to such production.” This can include communication employees, transportation employees and even employees who regularly use the mail or a telephone for interstate communication. However, some employees are classified as exempt from the minimum wage and/or overtime pay provisions. These can include executive, administrative and professional employees.

Some companies try to increase their profit margins by not properly paying overtime to qualifying employees, misclassifying employees to avoid paying overtime or not paying workers for time spent performing tasks they are required to do for work, such as putting on and taking off protective gear.

Unfortunately, misclassifying employees to avoid paying overtime and other work-arounds are far too common. All year – but especially during this season when people are picking up more shifts, extra hours and even extra jobs – it is important for employees to know they have rights under the FLSA.

* * *

Leon Hampton is a lawyer in the Firm’s Consumer Fraud section. He works on cases involving class action lawsuits, employment law and whistleblower claims. For more information about FLSA laws or other issues of employment law, contact Leon at 800-898-2034 or email Leon.Hampton@beasleyallen.com.

Sources:
USA Today
The Washington Post
U.S. Department of Labor

Free Legal Consultation
At Beasley Allen, there is never a fee for legal services, unless we collect for you. Contact us today by filling out a brief questionnaire, or by calling our toll free number, 1-800-898-2034, for a free, no-cost no-obligation evaluation of your case.

Legionnaires’ disease is on the rise across the U.S.

posted on:
December 4, 2017

author:
Staff

category:
Environmental

water Legionnaires’ disease is on the rise across the U.S.What’s something your house, a nuclear power plant and Disneyland all probably have in common? A cooling system. Homes, Disneyland and nuclear power plants all have systems in place to lower temperatures, albeit to varying degrees of sophistication. They serve an important purpose – particularly in warmer climates – but what many people don’t realize is they can also become contaminated by bacteria, putting people’s health and even lives at risk.

A poignant example made headlines this month when an outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease infected Disneyland visitors in Anaheim, California. The Happiest Place on Earth had to shut down two cooling towers after 12 people contracted the illness, nine of whom had visited the park in September, according to the Los Angeles Times. The other cases were people who lived or traveled in Anaheim. In total, 10 people were hospitalized and one person who had not visited Disneyland died.

Legionnaires’ disease, a serious type of pneumonia, is typically contracted by breathing in small droplets of water in the air that contain the bacteria Legionella, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) explains. Legionella occurs naturally in fresh water sources but becomes an issue in man-made water systems if left unchecked.

Infections can cause coughing, shortness of breath, fever and muscle aches any time from two days to two weeks after exposure to the bacteria. Though it is typically treatable with antibiotics, about one out of every 10 people who contract it will die from the infection. Common sources of infection include showers, cooling towers, decorative fountains and hot tubs.

For example, Beasley Allen handled a case stemming from a hotel hot tub contaminated with Legionella. A number of the individuals who stayed at the hotel, including several who were part of a girls’ softball team, became ill and tested positive for Legionnaires’ disease.

At the time the suit was filed in 2014, Beasley Allen attorney Ben Locklar, who handled the case, said, “Guests expect a reasonable amount of care to be taken in regards to health and safety. It is clear that the hotel’s water system and cooling system have not been properly maintained and that the infected were unknowingly exposed to bacteria-laden water, mist and air at the hotel.” The case settled earlier this year for an undisclosed amount.

According to CDC officials, Legionnaires’ disease has been steadily increasing since 2000. In 2014, 5,000 cases were reported, versus 6,000 in 2015. New York passed new regulations to try to reduce the number of legionnaires’ infections after a 2016 outbreak in the Bronx killed 16 and sickened 138 more, but experts say the new rules have had little effect.

The cause for the disease’s rise is still not understood, but possible reasons include better surveillance and testing mechanisms, an increase in the number of elderly citizens, aging plumbing systems, and temperature increases. While we wait to better understand the causes of Legionnaires’ rise, the increase clearly highlights the need to keep water systems well maintained. Not doing so can cost someone’s life.

Sources:
CDC
Los Angeles Times
Beasley Allen
Infectious Disease Today
Righting Injustice

Free Legal Consultation
At Beasley Allen, there is never a fee for legal services, unless we collect for you. Contact us today by filling out a brief questionnaire, or by calling our toll free number, 1-800-898-2034, for a free, no-cost no-obligation evaluation of your case.

Is SCOTUS poised to limit SEC whistleblowers?

posted on:
December 1, 2017

author:
Andrew Brashier

category:
Fraud

andew brashier1 Is SCOTUS poised to limit SEC whistleblowers?In oral arguments Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court seemed poised to bar whistleblowers from suing companies for illegal retaliation under the Dodd-Frank Act if they’ve only voiced their complaints about the alleged wrongdoing internally, and not to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

The arguments sought to clarify the definition of a whistleblower under the law as argued in the case of Paul Somers, a vice president and portfolio manager of Digital Realty in Singapore. He claims he was fired in 2014 after telling senior executives in San Francisco about potential financial misconduct in a company project in Hong Kong.

Mr. Somers sued Digital Realty, claiming the company violated whistleblower protections provided under the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010 when it fired him. The Act was introduced in the wake of the 2008 Wall Street collapse and prohibited employers from lashing out at anyone who “made disclosures” of potential violations and other wrongdoing.

The Dodd-Frank Act also defines a whistleblower as someone who tips off the SEC, and that is the narrow interpretation that the high court sounds willing to support.

A final ruling in the case is expected early next year. If the Supreme Court does bar internal whistleblowers from the law’s protections, it would reverse the decision of two circuit courts that had decided the case in Mr. Somers’ favor.

Digital Realty has maintained in its appeals of the case that the federal whistleblower law protects only those who report potential securities violations to the SEC.

Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch believes that U.S. courts should interpret the laws strictly according to their text instead of on their broader intent, and he expressed his frustration at the lower courts’ verdicts for Mr. Somers in Thursday’s hearing.

“I’m just stuck on the plain language here. How much clearer could Congress have been?” Gorsuch asked a lawyer for the whistleblower.

Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan acknowledged the loophole afforded by the law’s language and structure, calling it “odd.”

“It’s peculiar. It’s probably not what Congress meant. But what makes it the kind of thing where we can just ignore it?” she said. She also agreed that a literal interpretation of the law could produce misguided, conflicting results for whistleblowers.

* * *

Are you aware of fraud being committed against the federal government, or a state government? If so, you may be protected and rewarded for doing the right thing by reporting the fraud. If you have any questions about whether you qualify as a whistleblower, please contact an attorney at Beasley Allen for a free and confidential evaluation of your claim. There is a contact form on this website, or you may email one of the lawyers on our whistleblower litigation team: Archie Grubb, Larry Golston, Lance Gould or Andrew Brashier.

Sources:
Los Angeles Times
New York Times
RightingInjustice

Free Legal Consultation
At Beasley Allen, there is never a fee for legal services, unless we collect for you. Contact us today by filling out a brief questionnaire, or by calling our toll free number, 1-800-898-2034, for a free, no-cost no-obligation evaluation of your case.

Missouri judge upholds $110 million talc verdict

posted on:
November 30, 2017

author:
Staff

talc justice Missouri judge upholds $110 million talc verdictA Missouri judge has upheld the $110 million jury award to a Virginia woman who claimed that decades of daily use of Johnson & Johnson’s (NYSE: JNJ) talcum powder products caused her ovarian cancer.

After a review of post-trial evidence, Judge Rex M. Burlison of the 22nd Judicial Circuit Court has ruled that proper jurisdiction can be established in the state based on the significant role played by Union, Missouri-based PharmaTech in the processing, labeling, packaging and distribution of Johnson’s Baby Powder and Shower to Shower products. The May 2017 verdict was called into question following the U.S. Supreme Court’s Bristol Myers Squibb ruling, which established new, stringent jurisdictional standards for lawsuits filed by out-of-state plaintiffs.

“Upon review of the record and the standard as enunciated in Bristol Myers, the Court finds that Plaintiffs have sufficiently established that specific personal jurisdiction exists…” wrote Judge Burlison in a 12-page opinion issued Nov. 29.

During the trial the plaintiff, Lois Slemp, alleged that more than four decades of using talc-containing feminine hygiene products, including Johnson’s Baby Powder and Shower to Shower, led to the development of her cancer. Initially diagnosed in 2012, Ms. Slemp endured surgery and seven months of chemotherapy to combat the disease. Due to her physical condition she was only able to testify through an audio recording of her deposition.

After almost four weeks of testimony the jury awarded $5.4 million in compensatory damages and $105 million in punitive damages against Johnson & Johnson and co-defendant Imerys Talc America, which mines and supplies the talc used in J&J’s products.

“This ruling confirms that even the limited evidence we’ve uncovered regarding PharmaTech is sufficient to meet the high standard set by the Supreme Court, and should allow us to affirm the earlier verdicts and move forward with additional trials in Missouri,” said Ted Meadows, co-lead counsel for Ms. Slemp and a principal at the Beasley Allen Law Firm.

In 2016, three St. Louis trials brought by other women suffering from ovarian cancer led to jury verdicts of $70 million, $72 million and $55 million against J&J and Imerys.

“If you look at the record in each trial to date, the defendants have been very careful to hide the presence and role of PharmaTech,” said Allen Smith of the Smith Law Firm of Ridgeland, Mississippi, and co-lead counsel for Ms. Slemp. “Now that jurisdiction has been confirmed by the court, future trials will be able to more clearly show the steps J&J has taken to deceive the public and medical community of the dangers of talcum powder use for feminine hygiene.”

During the original trial, attorneys for Ms. Slemp called a number of prominent scientists and researchers who testified that more than 20 well-executed studies show a link between ovarian cancer and genital applications of talcum powder. The jury was also shown a trail of internal documents as evidence that J&J has known about those dangers for decades but has attempted to suppress and dismiss the findings.

For more information about the talc litigation, contact Barry Pound at 214-293-0860 or email barry@androvett.com.

Free Legal Consultation
At Beasley Allen, there is never a fee for legal services, unless we collect for you. Contact us today by filling out a brief questionnaire, or by calling our toll free number, 1-800-898-2034, for a free, no-cost no-obligation evaluation of your case.

Commercial vehicle-only lanes for Atlanta projected by 2029

posted on:
November 30, 2017

author:
Chris Glover

chris glover Commercial vehicle only lanes for Atlanta projected by 2029If you drive in metro Atlanta traffic regularly – or probably if you have driven in it even once – you probably think you’ve seen it all. However, the commercial motor vehicle (CMV)-only lanes that are planned on I-75 between Macon and McDonough would probably be a first. Only a few even remotely similar roadways exist in the country.

The two barrier-separated lanes will be designated specifically for commercial trucks of various sizes in hopes of reducing traffic volume and increasing safety and mobility, according to government documents.

“Georgia DOT is evaluating the potential addition of two designated commercial vehicle lanes on northbound I-75 between Macon and metro Atlanta to improve mobility for passenger vehicles and commercial freight carriers along one of the fastest growing corridors in the Southeast,” the agency said in an overview of the plan. “The I-75 Commercial Vehicle Lanes are part of Georgia’s plan to increase economic competitiveness and develop an integrated, multi-modal transportation network on our interstate highways.”

Engineering, environmental, design and right-of-way planning are expected to take place until 2024 with the projected completion date set for 2029. The project comes with an estimated $1.8 billion price tag.

For those who get nervous while driving beside an 18-wheeler, news of this type of managed lane probably seems like Christmas coming early. Unfortunately, these CMV-only lanes are relatively rare.

As a National Academy of Science (NAS) study found, “While there is a substantial body of information on CMV-only lanes from planning and feasibility studies, there are very few real-world applications of the concept.”

The Georgia project will be the first of its kind in the United States. Other similar concepts, which are more common, include separated lanes just for passenger vehicles, lane restrictions for trucks, truck lanes as they climb steep grades, etc.

These CMV-only lanes are expected to increase travel speeds and decrease delays because slower commercial vehicles won’t be present. They are also expected to increase safety, improve freight productivity, and reduce vehicle emissions. But it’s important to keep in mind this is still theoretical.

As the NAS study states: “The results from the performance evaluation task consistently indicate that truck-only lanes have higher safety benefits compared to mixed-flow lanes. However, the results are inconclusive in understanding the ‘true’ incremental safety benefits of truck lanes because of the differences in capacities between the truck-only and mixed-flow lane alternatives considered in the studies.”

Though it is still theory at this point, CMV-only lanes will likely be a reality soon enough, and, as always, the safety of the public should be at the forefront of all related decisions.

* * *

Chris Glover practices in Beasley Allen’s Atlanta office. He handles truck accident claims in Atlanta, throughout the state of Georgia, and nationwide. For more information about trucking litigation or to discuss a potential truck accident claim, contact Chris Glover at 800-898-2034 or email Chris.Glover@beasleyallen.com.

Sources:
Georgia DOT
Caltrans
National Academy of Science

Free Legal Consultation
At Beasley Allen, there is never a fee for legal services, unless we collect for you. Contact us today by filling out a brief questionnaire, or by calling our toll free number, 1-800-898-2034, for a free, no-cost no-obligation evaluation of your case.

Number of Invokana MDL lawsuits grows

posted on:
November 29, 2017

author:
Danielle Mason

danielle ward mason Number of Invokana MDL lawsuits growsIn less than a year, the number of lawsuits consolidated under the Invokana Multidistrict Litigation (MDL) has grown from 55 to 865, according to the U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey, where the MDL is located. The claims are against Invokana’s manufacturer Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen Pharmaceuticals alleging the drugmaker failed to properly test Invokana and warn of the risks and consequences of using the drug.

Beasley Allen has previously reported that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Invokana in 2013 as the first in a new class of type 2 diabetes drugs called SGLT2 inhibitors. The following year the agency approved Invokamet, a combination of Invokana and metformin. Within two years of being on the market, however, there were more than 100 reports of acute kidney injury in patients taking the drug. The reports led the FDA to order a stronger kidney warning to accompany several SGLT2 inhibitors, including Invokana and Invokamet.

Among the adverse side effects Invokana has been linked to is diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). DKA is kidney damage caused by a type of acidosis that develops when insulin levels are too low or during prolonged fasting. Beasley Allen has previously explained that it can lead to difficulty breathing, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, confusion and unusual fatigue or sleepiness. Beasley Allen also notes that the FDA has warned about other adverse effects, including serious urinary tract infections (UTIs), which can lead to a serious blood infection called urosepsis or kidney infection called pyelonephritis.

Earlier this year, results from an FDA-mandated clinical trial showed Invokana also doubled the risk of leg and foot amputations compared with outcomes of patients taking a placebo. The dangers were even present in patients who did not exhibit risk factors for amputation. The findings led some doctors to stop prescribing Invokana.

As evidence of the drug’s adverse side effects mounts, it is not surprising that the numbers of lawsuits are also climbing.

* * *

Lawyers in Beasley Allen’s Mass Torts Section are investigating claims on behalf of individuals and families with claims they were injured by Invokana and Invokamet, specifically cases involving DKA, acute kidney injury, and amputations. If you would like more information, contact Danielle Ward Mason, a lawyer in our Mass Torts Section. She can be reached at 800-898-2034 or by email at Danielle.Mason@beasleyallen.com.

Sources:
U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey
Beasley Allen

Free Legal Consultation
At Beasley Allen, there is never a fee for legal services, unless we collect for you. Contact us today by filling out a brief questionnaire, or by calling our toll free number, 1-800-898-2034, for a free, no-cost no-obligation evaluation of your case.

Beasley Allen kicks off Christmas donations on #GivingTuesday

posted on:
November 28, 2017

author:
Staff

category:
Community

Christmas delivery Shutterstock Beasley Allen kicks off Christmas donations on #GivingTuesdaySince 2012, people around the globe have used #GivingTuesday, the Tuesday after Thanksgiving, to give back to their communities as a kick-off to the Christmas giving season. This year Beasley Allen Law Firm is joining those around the United States and in more than 90 other countries on #GivingTuesday as we show our support and appreciation for the nonprofits and businesses that aid our communities.

As part of #GivingTuesday, Beasley Allen began its charitable donations Nov. 28 for this Christmas season and will continue to donate to a different cause each week until Christmas. Beasley Allen employees collected and delivered toy donations for the Hands of Christ Ministry’s Toy Store. This ministry sets up a “store” where those who qualify will be able to purchase our donated toys for ages 3-16 at extremely discounted prices in order to allow them to feel the joy of providing Christmas for their families. Thanks to the donations from our staff, Beasley Allen was able to donate toys to 75 children in the River Region.

Beasley Allen will be continuing the spirit of #GivingTuesday each week until Christmas by donating to the following:

  • Capitol Hill Healthcare—Each year Capitol Hill puts up an angel tree for its residents. Beasley Allen employees will be giving presents to 90 of those angels this Christmas season. These gifts often include items the residents need such as clothing, socks and hygiene products.
  • Friendship Mission—The Friendship Mission houses approximately 100 men, women and children living in two shelters in the River Region. They serve approximately 8,000 meals each month between the two shelters. Beasley Allen will provide 35 Bath and Body Works gift sets and necessities like socks, gloves, hats, deodorant, toothpaste, etc. to be distributed at the shelters this Christmas.
  • Family Sunshine Center—The center has served victims and survivors of family violence in the River Region for 35 years. As with the nursing home and mission, Beasley Allen has long supported the Sunshine Center’s work in our community. This year we will donate necessities like clothes and shoes as well as presents for six families.

“The organizations we are supporting this season provide invaluable services to the River Region, and while we support many throughout the year, Christmas giving is especially important to us here at the firm,” Beasley Allen managing partner Tom Methvin said. “We thank these agencies for the great work they do.”

Free Legal Consultation
At Beasley Allen, there is never a fee for legal services, unless we collect for you. Contact us today by filling out a brief questionnaire, or by calling our toll free number, 1-800-898-2034, for a free, no-cost no-obligation evaluation of your case.
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